The Inbetweeners – Liminal Spaces and Transitions in VR/360

The Echo Chamber – Notes 05

One of the most interesting of the formal challenges of creating media for VR/360 appears to be how to make the most of the transitions between shots or scenes.

As a filmmaker in the old media linear world, you have a toolkit of tricks at your disposal when cutting between shots. You can fade between shots (black or white) or simply cut between them. There are plenty of subtleties within the fade or cut including of course how long is the fade, and where in the action do you place the cut to create the desired effects of of pace, atmosphere and energy.

In a VR/360 experience the viewer rather that watching the transition is ‘within’ the transition. They have some presence ‘inside the cut’.

A viewer watching TV or video is essentially watching a moving two dimensional image, with any transition between shots an absence of image, that we all now read and understand as indicating the end of one thing and the start of another.

Hal_C._Kern_(Gone_with_the_Wind_-_1939)
Hal C. Kern, Supervising Editor of Gone with the Wind 1939

The fade from shot to black to new shot is probably the device that we’re most familiar and arguably comfortable with as it probably most closely represents the transition that we all experience with our own eyes as we blink (blink and see what you think). Filmmakers have other tricks up their sleeves as well including the wipe, where one shot is wiped away by an incoming shot and the iris transition where the action narrows to black, via a shrinking (usually round) window onto the shot.

In a VR/360 experience the viewer rather that watching the transition is ‘within’ the transition. They have some presence ‘inside the cut’. This means that the rarely considered fade has to become something a bit more ‘immersive’ and can become a useful narrative and experiential device.

Expanding this thought a bit and indeed the transition itself, you can begin to imagine how the transition could become an important liminal space within the film. Liminality is the state of ‘in-betweenness’ where one is underway within a ritual or experience, but not yet complete – literally ‘on the threshold’.

We’re still thinking hard about how we make the most of these liminal spaces within our own film. What we’re certain of, is that the visual transition will need to work in concert with the sound design. We’re developing a series of explicit and hidden audio cues that will prepare (and confound) the viewer to expect certain things to happen.

We’ve been discussing what it would be like if the fade dropped down onto us from above like a black blanket, or if the fade mixed up from our feet to our heads. We spent a lovely afternoon this week with our friends at Ardman Animations considering some other approaches as well, including borrowing from the visual iconography of video games – more of that in another post.

What is certain is that the moments that transition between the shots, these liminal spaces, may end up being as important as the shots themselves – they may in effect become micro shots – which then brings us back to the question of what do we put between them?